Picture Consequences experiment

Picture consequences is an old game where you fold up a page into 3 equal parts and one person draws either a head, body or legs depending what part of the page they are required to draw on. Normally the previous drawer has left some sort of Mark so the next creation has a starting point. I was interested in this idea as I had read that the surrealist used to interact with this game while meeting in cafes.

I wanted to collaborate an Abstract library where the abstract works that I have practice with could be pulled together to create one piece of work. The idea occurred after the practice took place so I was not thinking about creating one large piece  of work at the time, I was thinking about the movement of the medium and the interaction it has when the fluid paint came into he environment of either water, glue, filler, wool, pencil shavings, LEGO bricks, sand, dried flowers, pepper,shaving foam and cleaning products.

The first experiment;t I cut 4 A2 pages into 6 5cm strips and laid them on the floor. These pages were worked on in the exercise, ‘dripping, splattering ; Jackson Pollock style’. I then weaved them together to create something else. I wanted to explore the concept of taking a piece of work and abstracting its form, Like Frank Stella with the work Kastura (p.445 The Art book).  The concept of deconstruction to reconstruct is another process in my abstraction technique practice showen in the following image.


The next series of work is pages from my workbook. I have worked with certain colours that I think Reflected the normal natural tones such as Greens, Red Browns and Blue with white. I have cut these pages into sections. So they will flap over to be part of another page and by doing so the possibilities of creating an abstract library where techniques can be seen together are assembled with the help of the game ; picture consequences.  Unlike the game where the page is divided up into sections of ; head, body and feet, its more suited to areas of foreground, mid ground and background, or no perspective at all but playing with the idea of textural Abstract works.


References

The art book. Phaidon press limited London 1994

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s